Aralen for lupus

Discussion in 'Hydroxychloroquine' started by VirtualFutbolist, 22-Feb-2020.

  1. Anatolii Moderator

    Aralen for lupus


    In autoimmune diseases, your immune system attacks itself. Lupus causes the immune system to mistake healthy tissues for germs, viruses, and other invaders.

    Plaquenil elevated liver enzymes Plaquenil vision changes

    Drugs prescribed for lupus include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin or ibuprofen; acetaminophen; antimalarials such as hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil and chloroquine Aralen, corticosteroids such as prednisone or medrol; immune suppressants such as azathioprine Imuran, methotrexate Rheumatrex. Chloroquine is the generic form of the brand-name prescription medicine Aralen, which is used to prevent and treat malaria — a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite — and to treat amebiasis, an infection of the intestines caused by a parasite. Find patient medical information for Aralen Oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and user ratings.

    This attack can affect many parts of your body and often causes symptoms. The system then creates autoantibodies that attack your body’s own organs.

    Aralen for lupus

    Aralen - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses, Chloroquine Aralen - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions.

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  5. Some people with lupus try creams, ointments, fish oil, or supplements they can buy without a prescription. Some people try homeopathy or see a chiropractor to care for their lupus. Some people with lupus who try these types of treatments say that they help. Research studies have not shown any benefits to these types of treatments.

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    Aralen is a prescription medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration FDA in 1949 to treat malaria. Aralen is also prescribed to treat inflammation associated with lupus. Aralen is also k. Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil Chloroquine Aralen Quinacrine Atabrine What are anti-malarial drugs, and why are they used to treat lupus? Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil, chloroquine Aralen, and quinacrine Atabrine are medications that were originally used to prevent or treat malaria. Aralen is a prescription medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration FDA in 1949 to treat malaria. Aralen is also prescribed to treat inflammation associated with lupus. Aralen is also known by its drug name, Chloroquine. Aralen may not be appropriate for people with certain vision conditions or known hypersensitivity to related.

     
  6. Sovetique Moderator

    10 mg (conventional) PO q8hr or 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily initially; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN Maintenance: 10-20 mg (conventional) PO q8hr up to 20-30 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 180 mg/day (conventional) or 120 mg/day (extended release) 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN; not to exceed 90 mg/day (Adalat CC) or 120 mg/day (Procardia XL) 30 mg (extended-release) PO q12hr; may be increased to 120-240 mg/day (monitor) 30-120 mg (extended release) PO once daily 0.2% topical gel/ointment (extemporaneously compounded) q12hr for 3-6 weeks 20 mg sublingual Peritoneal dialysis (PD) or hemodialysis (HD): Supplemental dose not necessary Cirrhosis: Consider dose adjustment Take on empty stomach Avoid conventional (ie, immediate-release) product; potential for hypotension and risk of precipitating myocardial ischemia 10 mg (conventional) PO q8hr or 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily initially; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN Maintenance: 10-20 mg (conventional) PO q8hr up to 20-30 mg PO q6-8hr; not to exceed 180 mg/day (conventional) or 120 mg/day (extended release) 30-60 mg (extended release) PO once daily; may be increased every 7-14 days PRN; not to exceed 90 mg/day (Adalat CC) or 120 mg/day (Procardia XL) Adverse effects differ between short-acting (conventional) and extended-release formulations, with the conventional preparations having more serious adverse drug reactions in some cases Peripheral edema (10-30%) Dizziness (23-27%) Flushing (23-27%) Headache (10-23%) Heartburn (11%) Nausea (11%) Muscle cramps (8%) Mood change (7%) Nervousness (7%) Cough (6%) Dyspnea (6%) Palpitations (6%) Wheezing (6%) Hypotension, transient (5%) Urticaria (2%) Pruritus (2%) Constipation ( Hypersensitivity to nifedipine or other calcium-channel blockers Cardiogenic shock Concomitant administration with strong CYP3A4 inducers (eg, rifampin, rifabutin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St John's wort) significantly reduces nifedipine efficacy Immediate release preparation (sublingually or orally) for urgent or emergent hypertension Use with caution in (≤4 weeks) myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure (CHF), advanced aortic stenosis, peripheral edema, symptomatic hypotension, unstable angina, concurrent use of beta blockers, hepatic or renal impairment, persistent progressive dermatologic reactions, exacerbation of angina (during initiation of treatment, after a dose increase, or after withdrawal of beta blocker) Short-acting nifedipine may be less safe than other calcium-channel blockers in management of angina, hypertension, or acute MI Use cautiously in combination with quinidine Conventional (short-acting) form not indicated for hypertension Use extended-release form with caution in severe GI stenosis; rare reports of GI obstructive symptoms in patients with known strictures or without history of GI obstruction in association with ingestion of long-acting nifedipine; bezoars can occur in very rare cases and may necessitate surgical intervention Extended-release form contains lactose; thus, patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, Lapp lactase deficiency, or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicine Cirrhosis: Clearance reduced and systemic exposure increased CYP3A inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole clarithromycin, erythromycin, grapefruit, nefazodone, saquinavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir) may inhibit nifedipine metabolism and result in increased exposure when coadministered Strong CYP3A inducers (eg, rifampin, rifabutin, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and St John’s wort) may enhance nifedipine metabolism and result in decreased exposure when coadministered Avoid use in heart failure due to lack of benefit, and/or worse outcomes with calcium channel blockers in general Use with caution in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and outflow tract obstruction; reduction in afterload may worsen symptoms associated with this condition Avoid use of immediate release formulation in the elderly; may cause hypotension and risk precipitating myocardial ischemia Pregnancy category: C Lactation: Drug is distributed into breast milk; manufacturer suggests discontinuing drug or refraining from nursing (however, American Academy of Pediatrics states that drug is safe for nursing) A: Generally acceptable. Contact the applicable plan provider for the most current information. Nifedipine Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More Plaquenil and cellcept anyone on both? Also nifedipine vs. MANAGEMENT OF DIFFICULT URTICARIA
     
  7. Andronics Well-Known Member

    Let me tell you what weaning down from Plaquenil is like. So that's the update. The lesson here is - for those who need to go off plaquenil, be careful about just going off it cold turkey. Obviously some of CAN do that, but if you don't know if you're one of them - better to be on the safe side and wean slowly. Take it from me! I am feeling much better after bumping my dose back up over the last few.

    Going off Plaquenil - Sclero Forums MAIN - Sclero Forums